Cody Isabel, 26, from Kansas City, Missouri, took to TikTok to share five things he would never do as a neuroscientist to keep his brain sharp

A neuroscientist reveals the five things EVERYONE should do to protect their brain

A neuroscientist has revealed the five things everyone should do to protect their brain, including meditating and working out.

Cody Isabel, 26, of Kansas City, Missouri, regularly posts videos on his TikTok channel sharing neurology tips with his more than 122,000 followers.

In a video, which has racked up more than 1.3 million views, Cody shared five things he would never do as a neuroscientist.

He encouraged his followers to ‘prioritize’ these five areas of their lives ‘instead of ignoring them’ and promised they would see a change in their mental health, physical health and general lifestyle as well. less than 30 days.

Cody Isabel, 26, from Kansas City, Missouri, took to TikTok to share five things he would never do as a neuroscientist to keep his brain sharp

Never ‘disturb your sleep’

First on his list of things he would never do was

First on his list of things he would never do was “mess up” his sleep schedule.

First on his list of things he would never do was “disrupt” his sleep schedule.

He added: “Less sleep equals less life.”

He went on to explain that sleep decreases inflammation in the brain caused by “everyday life trauma”.

According to Brain&Life, more than 60% of Americans report that their sleep needs are not met in a typical week.

Research suggests that ongoing sleep deficits can have a huge impact on the brain.

Studies have proven that sleep deprivation can impede learning, impair cognitive performance, and slow reaction time.

Many neurologists have compared lack of sleep to intoxication but without the buzzing.

In addition to slowing down mental abilities such as learning, speaking, and reading, a lack of sleep can also cause memory problems.

Additionally, scientists have recently established a link between sleep deprivation and Alzheimer’s disease.

In a recent study of 70 healthy adults, the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that shorter sleep durations and overall sleep quality are linked to a greater load of beta-amyloid, which is the protein associated with Alzheimer’s disease.

Meditate regularly

Cody revealed he always meditates because it helps reduce anxiety and depression

Cody revealed he always meditates because it helps reduce anxiety and depression

Cody encouraged his followers to meditate as he revealed he would never skip a meditation session.

‘[Meditation] is an easy way to calm your mind, decrease anxiety, decrease depression, and reduce inflammation in your brain.

He added that he meditates 10 minutes a day and it improves your overall quality of life.

A UCLA study backed up Cody’s claims as it found that long-term meditators had better brain preservation than non-meditators as they aged.

Participants who had meditated for about 20 years had more gray matter volume, which contains most of the brain’s neuronal cell bodies, while those who had not meditated throughout their lives had less gray matter volume. .

Another Yale study found that meditation decreased activity in the Default Mode Network or DMN, which is the area of ​​the brain responsible for wandering and self-referential thoughts.

DMN is active when our minds aren’t thinking about anything in particular and just jump from thought to thought.

Since wandering thoughts are often associated with higher levels of anxiety and depression, the study showed that by decreasing these thoughts with meditation, you can decrease levels of anxiety and depression.

Additionally, John Hopkins has proven that meditation has the ability to reduce symptoms of depression, anxiety, and pain.

The study noted that frequent meditation can help manage symptoms.

Reduce your alcohol consumption

The neuroscientist admitted that he would never abuse alcohol because it

The neuroscientist admitted he would never abuse alcohol because it ‘fires your brain’

The third thing the neuroscientist admitted was that he would never drink alcohol.

He added: “Alcohol directly inflames your brain and depresses you.”

According to the American Addiction Centers, short- and long-term heavy drinking can have negative effects on your brain.

Heavy, long-term drinking can lead to learning and memory problems and even lead to the development or worsening of mental health issues.

Alcohol also upsets the balance of the brain and forces a person to adapt in order to compensate for the effects of alcohol.

Alcohol also has immediate effects on your brain due to its influence on the brain’s communication and information processing pathways.

This means that excessive alcohol consumption, even over a short period of time, can lead to confusion, impaired motor coordination and reduced decision-making ability.

Additionally, continuing to drink heavily in the short and long term can lead to alcohol poisoning and further reduce your brain’s cognitive performance.

Make sure you are active every day

“I would never be so busy that I couldn’t train or not train,” Cody said.

“I would never be so busy that I couldn’t train or not train,” said the neuroscientist.

Cody added that working out or staying active releases BDNF, which decreases brain fog and increases your ability to learn.

According to the Dana Foundation, during exercise your heart rate increases, as does blood flow to your brain.

Exercise is also said to lower your mood and overall stress by releasing chemicals like dopamine and endorphins that make you feel happy.

It has also been proven that people who exercise are happier and less stressed and anxious than those who don’t.

Exercise will also help you make decisions and control your emotions when you are upset or angry.

In addition to boosting your mood, a gym membership will also improve your memory and help you sleep better.

One study found that cognitive decline is nearly twice as common among inactive adults as among those who are active.

According to the CDC, most adults should aim for at least 150 minutes of physical activity each week.

This can be broken down into 30-minute exercise sessions five days a week at moderate intensity levels to help improve your brain.

Be Decisive in Keeping Your Brain Healthy

He added that he is always decisive when making decisions to avoid brain fog.

He added that he is always decisive when making decisions to avoid brain fog.

Cody admitted the last thing he would ever do was “let indecision hold [him] return’

‘Our brains are made to decide things, to act [on] things and we learn by failure,” he said at the end of his video.

He added that he learns by “acting, accessing, adjusting”.

According to Headspace, worry is at the root of an inability to make decisions.

When a person worries about the choices they have to make or the potential outcomes of those choices, they often respond with avoidance.

While it may seem easier to let your mind get distracted and avoid decision-making, eventually it will catch up with you and cause you to enter a state of worry and loss of focus.

Making decisive decisions can help you focus better in the long run, and each time you make a decision, you teach your brain to focus better on one thing at a time.

It also results in less brain fog, reduced stress, and lower anxiety levels.

The neuroscientist’s video has been viewed millions of times and thousands of users have taken to his comments section to share their thoughts on his five tips.

In his video, Cody promised his followers that if they prioritized these five things, they could “cure” their brains.

Many users thanked Cody for enlightening them and sharing his advice, while others, mostly new parents, joked that their

Many users thanked Cody for enlightening them and sharing his advice, while others, mostly new parents, joked that their “newborn” wouldn’t agree with him.

Many users thanked Cody for enlightening them and sharing his advice, while others, mostly new parents, joked that their “newborn” wouldn’t agree with him.

“This is the content I’m here for,” said one user.

Another user added, “Starting to meditate during COVID has literally changed my life.”

‘Law. Assess. Adjust. It’s so helpful. I am an analysis paralyzed person. Fail forward. Love it,” one user commented.

Another user wrote, “Coming back to this list when you have kids.”

“Sending this to my newborn,” added another user.

A neuroscientist reveals the five things EVERYONE should do to protect their brain

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