Energy-hungry appliances will DOUBLE your annual electric bill after price cap hike

Ofgem’s latest price cap hike will affect 24 million homes and send the cost of using devices skyrocketing.

An 80% increase in the energy price cap will take place on October 1, the annual energy bill for an average household from £1,971 to £3,549.

At the start of 2022, the average annual bill was £1,277, but the price cap is expected to rise even further next year, possibly reaching over £6,600.

Boiling a kettle for a cup of tea will cost you an extra £60 over a year under the new price cap.

While charging phones and laptops will only increase by 20p and £5.85 a year respectively.

Energy regulator Ofgem estimates the new electricity unit tariffs will be around 52p per kWh, up from 28p currently.

There have also been many calls for new support schemes to help households cope with rising costs in the face of a desperate struggle this winter.

Consumer Website Data Which? and Uswitch shows how much the cost of running electronics is expected to increase under the new energy price cap.

The price cap on energy bills will rise by 80% on October 1, meaning a household’s average annual energy bill will drop from £1,971 to £3,549.

Washing machines use a lot of energy and will cost around £60 more to run than they did this year

Washing machines use a lot of energy and will cost around £60 more to run than they did this year

The price cap is expected to rise even further, which means devices will end up consuming even more power

The price cap is expected to rise even further, which means devices will end up consuming even more power

Electric showers are the most power-hungry appliances, based on average use they will cost £286.97 a year according to Uswitch

Electric showers are the most power-hungry appliances, based on average use they will cost £286.97 a year according to Uswitch

The Washing machine is one of the most frequently used devices that can be difficult to cut down on.

Average annual washing machine running costs will rise from just over £63 to over £117.

The total figure may vary depending on how often the machine is used and its size.

To save as much money as possible, which one? recommends avoiding small loads and putting only one if the machine is about 80% full.

Low temperature washes, 30°C, can reduce energy consumption by an average of 38% compared to a wash at 40°C.

The average cost of running a clothes dryer throughout the year will nearly double from £56 to £104 – with some pricey models set to cost £359.

The invoice is calculated on the use of the machine on a standard program three times a week.

Bills can be reduced by not using the machine and hanging them outdoors or indoors, but with the windows open to prevent moisture.

Watching TV will be subject to relatively marginal increases: £8.50.

Machines like the clothes dryer will be more expensive to use, but there are cheaper alternatives such as hanging wet clothes outside.

Machines like the clothes dryer will be more expensive to use, but there are cheaper alternatives such as hanging wet clothes outside.

Monthly energy costs will see some households spend £500 a month on bills according to Uswitch

Monthly energy costs will see some households spend £500 a month on bills according to Uswitch

Watching TV will be almost the same price, with just a slight increase of £8.50 expected year on year

Watching TV will be almost the same price, with just a slight increase of £8.50 expected year on year

Electric showers are on average the most expensive fixtures in common use, normally racking up an annual bill of £159.43, but after October 1 they will cost £286.97 according to Uswitch.

They are used for an hour and 27 minutes per week on average and will cost an additional £127.54 per year.

Fewer showers or colder showers are the best ways to save money.

The cost of an average dishwasher will rise from £83 to £153, assuming it is used five times a week.

Even the smaller, cheaper-to-run models will see a nearly £40 increase.

Like the clothes dryer, it’s possible to save money by not using the dishwasher and washing things by hand – although this uses more water.

The fridge-freezer is commonplace in every kitchen and is almost always on all year round.

Newer models are very energy efficient, but will still drop from £73 to £136.

There are few things that can save money with fridge-freezers other than making sure the door is closed, the door seals aren’t damaged, and letting leftovers cool before refrigerating. .

Keeping the fridge-freezer door closed is one way to save money, as running the machine all year round is expected to cost £136

Keeping the fridge-freezer door closed is one way to save money, as running the machine all year round is expected to cost £136

Your energy bill will vary depending on whether you have a gas or electric bill.  Microwaves are the cheapest option for heating food over a year

Your energy bill will vary depending on whether you have a gas or electric bill. Microwaves are the cheapest option for heating food over a year

Ovens use less electricity than other household appliances, a single gas oven costs just £20 a year while a single electric oven costs £66.

From October it will cost £118 for a double electric oven, £54 for a double gas oven, £122 for a single electric oven and £43 for a single gas oven.

Microwaves, air fryers or slow cookers are alternatives that can save money, while cooking in bulk can reduce energy consumption.

It usually costs 87 pence a day to run an electric cooker, double cookers usually cost 72 pence a day and a gas cooker costs 33 pence a day to run.

Slow cookers cost 16 pence a day, while air fryers usually add 14 pence a day to energy bills, a microwave only costs 8 pence a day to use.

The research was based on cookers used for 43 minutes per day on average, and all other appliances used for 20 minutes.

Kettles will drop from £76.51 a year to £137.72.

Using more efficient appliances could typically save households £287 a year, according to the research, which has been published as part of a new campaign with budget supermarket Iceland.

Energy-hungry appliances will DOUBLE your annual electric bill after price cap hike

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