As people increasingly struggle with money amid the cost of living crisis, a woman has asked others for their money-saving tips on Mumsnet (stock image)

UK cost of living crisis: how to save money at home

The cost of living crisis has hit many families hard, leaving them with less money to spend on the bare minimum, including energy and food.

In an informative thread on UK parents’ forum Mumsnet, parents shared their practical tips for cutting the costs of basic necessities.

The discussion was sparked when a woman revealed she’ll consider recharging electrical devices at the office if her energy bills get too high and may fill a thermos with boiling water at work to take her home.

Some of the tips they shared include showering at the gym, making sure to check the price per kilo of loose items like fruit and vegetables, and turning off electrical appliances, instead of turning them on.” standby”.

As people increasingly struggle with money amid the cost of living crisis, a woman has asked others for their money-saving tips on Mumsnet (stock image)

According to the message, the Mumsnetter plans to use electricity at work and bulk food in bulk as fuel prices rise.

According to the message, the Mumsnetter plans to use electricity at work and bulk food in bulk as fuel prices rise.

The original poster wrote: ‘The best is… a visit to the card factory for cheap cards and gift bags, then picking up gifts from garage sales or charity shops.

“I have some brilliant children’s party favors for 50p so with the card and a cheap gift bag I’ve already brought in the cost of a present for a pound.

“Looking for advice, you can obviously buy porridge oats in bulk cheaper than buying expensive children’s cereal etc, but anything that’s smart or people might not have thought before.

“I don’t know how bad the fuel crisis will be, but consider charging batteries to charge phones at work and taking a thermos of boiled water home.”

The post drew many responses, with people sharing a range of advice from buying solar packs to charge their devices to paying for insurance on a credit card at 0% interest.

Advice shared by forum users ranged from using 0% credit cards to pay for essentials like insurance to turning off electrical appliances at the socket.

Advice shared by forum users ranged from using 0% credit cards to pay for essentials like insurance to turning off electrical appliances at the socket.

One savvy saver shared his top tip, writing, “If you’re the type of person who pays for your car/home/pet insurance monthly rather than annually, you’re paying more than you need.

“Pull out a 0% spend credit card, where the 0% lasts at least 12 months, and buy your annual policies on that. Then pay monthly. Save a fortune.

Others recommended reducing the amount of household cleaner you use, with one saying, “Cut the dishwasher tablets in half.”

Another agreed that using less than the recommended amount of cleaning products can save money, adding: “Use powder detergent, not liquid (better for the machine anyway) and half the indicated amount of washing powder unless it is really dirty.”

‘Don’t bother with the fabric softener either, you honestly won’t notice the difference. If you like a scent, put on a capful of zoflora-like stuff instead.

Another commenter added: ‘Someone on Twitter says his electricity costs have been reduced significantly by turning everything off at the sockets when not in use.’

“I always thought it would be pennies rather than pounds saved, but maybe it depends on what kind of devices you normally have plugged in. Worth it, either way.”

Substituting beans for meat and being vigilant when checking fruit and veg prices per pound could help you save money, according to these Mumsnetters

Substituting beans for meat and being vigilant when checking fruit and veg prices per pound could help you save money, according to these Mumsnetters

Others shared the money-saving tricks they are implementing to make their food go further.

One Mumsnetter wrote: “Going vegetarian most of the time saves a lot of money and it’s better for the planet”.

“Dried beans and legumes are really economical. Try replacing a Friday night curry with homemade dhal.

Another added: ‘When buying your fruit and veg check the price per kilo on the label. Often, smaller bags are cheaper per kilo than larger bags. Sometimes ‘value’ vegetables are higher per kilo which is illegal and therefore can be taken to management and removed immediately. It used to be gross, bagged fruit and veg was cheaper than bulk, but that seems to have pretty much stopped.

And another Mumsnetter wrote, “The advice I always give is to plan the menu and shop once a week, but actually make your week 8 days. On day 8, use all odd pieces from the fridge. This way you have 46 weeks of shopping per year and earn 6 weeks of extra cleaning money. It funds our Christmas.

Some revealed that they will use energy at work or go to the office more than they need to get the most out of heating and save on heating their homes.

Some revealed that they will use energy at work or go to the office more than they need to get the most out of heating and save on heating their homes.

UK cost of living crisis: how to save money at home

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