DR CLARE BAILEY: Menopause alone can certainly trigger severe insomnia.  This is partly because as you begin to go through menopause, levels of the critical sex hormones estrogen and progesterone drop.

A problem shared by Clare Bailey, mother of four and general practitioner: is my new insomnia due to menopause?

A problem shared by Clare Bailey, mother of four and general practitioner: is my new insomnia due to menopause?

Q Having slept well for years, I suddenly struggle with insomnia. Not only do I have trouble falling asleep in the first place, but I tend to wake up early in the morning and then can take a few hours to get back to sleep. I’m in my late 40s – could this be menopause related? Or could it be general anxiety caused by the past trying years? What can I do about this?

A I’m sorry to hear that you suffer from insomnia, which is a common but distressing condition that not only puts you at greater risk for various problems, from cancer to heart disease, but can also lead to anxiety and the Depression.

Menopause alone can certainly trigger severe insomnia. That’s partly because when you start going through menopause, levels of the key sex hormones estrogen and progesterone drop, often leading to hot flashes, mood swings, and problems with mental health. sleep.

DR CLARE BAILEY: Menopause alone can certainly trigger severe insomnia. This is partly because as you begin to go through menopause, levels of the critical sex hormones estrogen and progesterone drop.

Whatever the cause of your insomnia, one of the main things you can do to improve it is to adopt a regular pattern (file image)

When this happened to me, I found that the hot flashes disturbed my sleep. It may be small consolation, but you’re not alone: ​​About 60% of postmenopausal women report occasional insomnia. And because hormonal changes mean many middle-aged women gain weight, they also report snoring, which further disrupts your sleep.

Can algae reverse the course of disease?

I love Japanese cuisine, especially nori, a seaweed used in sushi.

In a study conducted at the University of Wollongong, Australia, overweight patients who consumed seaweed extract saw a 10% improvement in their cholesterol levels and a 27% reduction in markers of chronic inflammation – a key contributor to diseases such as heart disease, cancer, type 2 diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

So what can you do? Well, whatever the cause of your insomnia, one of the key things you can do to improve it is to adopt a regular pattern: go to bed at the same time and get up at the same time every day. .

A morning walk is important for resetting your internal clock, which needs bright light to realign it. A brisk walk is also a great way to reduce anxiety.

What you eat also plays an important role in your sleep, which is why I recommend a Mediterranean-style diet rich in fatty fish, vegetables and legumes. The combination of omega-3 fatty acids from fish and fiber from vegetables has been shown to aid sleep. It’s also important to cut back on sugary treats, as we know that junk food contributes to anxiety. I post many healthy meal recipes on Instagram.

You report waking up early in the morning, which is a common form of insomnia, and there are ways to fix it. First, practice deep breathing, like the 4-2-4. You inhale for a count of four, hold your breath for a count of two, then exhale again for a count of four. Take your deep breaths, so you can feel your belly rising and falling.

If that doesn’t work, after about ten minutes, get out of bed, find a quiet place, and read or listen to music. Don’t use your phone and start looking at social media. When you start to feel tired, go back to bed.

Finally, you may want to consider hormone replacement therapy (HRT). A trial of over 400 postmenopausal women found that those taking HRT reported significantly less insomnia.

You’ve probably seen the headlines suggesting cooking with a microwave, rather than turning on the oven, to save on skyrocketing energy bills. I use ours daily, but had the sneaky feeling that it might damage the nutrients.

In fact, the microwave tends to retain them in food better than other cooking methods. However, the container you use in the microwave is important. Many plastics contain harmful hormone-disrupting substances, which can leach into your food.

So only use containers if they are labeled for microwave. And always check that the food is well cooked.

You can write to Clare at drclarebailey@dailymail.co.uk or Daily Mail, Northcliffe House, 2 Derry Street, London W8 5TT.

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A problem shared by Clare Bailey, mother of four and general practitioner: is my new insomnia due to menopause?

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