Convicted fraudster Elizabeth Holmes appeared in court on Thursday

Theranos fraudster Elizabeth Holmes returns to court in final bid to overturn her conviction

Convicted fraudster Elizabeth Holmes appeared in court on Thursday

Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes appeared in federal court seeking to have her fraud conviction overturned ahead of her October sentencing.

Holmes appeared at the federal courthouse in San Jose, Calif., on Thursday, where her attorneys argued that no rational juror could have found her guilty beyond a reasonable doubt – as 12 jurors found when they sentenced her in January.

‘Mrs. Holmes did not make false statements ‘to investors’ and did not know she was making false statements,” Holme’s attorney, Amy Saharia, told the judge, according to Bloomberg.

Holmes, 38, faces up to 20 years in prison following his conviction for conspiracy and wire fraud, and is currently free on $500,000 bond pending his sentencing hearing next month.

Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes (center) appeared in federal court in a long-running bid to have her fraud conviction overturned ahead of her October sentencing.

Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes (center) appeared in federal court in a long-running bid to have her fraud conviction overturned ahead of her October sentencing.

Holmes, seen with her mother, appeared in the federal courthouse in San Jose, Calif., on Thursday, where her lawyers argued that no rational juror could have found her guilty.

Holmes, seen with her mother, appeared in the federal courthouse in San Jose, Calif., on Thursday, where her lawyers argued that no rational juror could have found her guilty.

Former Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes goes through a security checkpoint as she arrives in federal court on Thursday in San Jose, Calif.

Former Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes goes through a security checkpoint as she arrives in federal court on Thursday in San Jose, Calif.

On Thursday, she entered the courthouse accompanied by her parents, smiling and wearing a gray button-up jacket over a simple black dress.

His lawyers’ attempt to have his conviction overturned is a standard move in white-collar cases, but almost never succeeds.

Holmes was found guilty of misleading investors in her $9 billion startup Theranos, which claimed to have revolutionized medical testing while relying on existing technology from other vendors.

At trial, Holmes’ lawyers claimed she was the innocent pawn of her manipulative and abusive lover and business partner Ramesh ‘Sunny’ Balwani, claims he fervently denied.

In July, Balwani was found guilty on 12 counts of defrauding both Theranos investors and patients who relied on the company’s extremely unreliable blood tests that could have compromised their health.

Balwani, 57, also faces up to 20 years in prison and is free on $750,000 bond pending his November 15 sentencing hearing.

Holmes is due to be sentenced on October 17.

Holmes smiled as he entered the courthouse to make his final plea in court

Holmes smiled as he entered the courthouse to make his final plea in court

Former Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes goes through security as she arrives in federal court

Former Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes goes through security as she arrives in federal court

Holmes was all smiles as she arrived to make a Hail Mary attempt to overturn her conviction

Holmes was all smiles as she arrived to make a Hail Mary attempt to overturn her conviction

Holmes appeared in federal court in an attempt to overturn his fraud conviction.  She faces jail time after being found guilty of four counts of fraud

Holmes appeared in federal court in an attempt to overturn his fraud conviction. She faces jail time after being found guilty of four counts of fraud

She entered the courthouse accompanied by her parents, smiling and wearing a gray button-up jacket over a simple black dress

She entered the courthouse accompanied by her parents, smiling and wearing a gray button-up jacket over a simple black dress

Ramesh

Ramesh ‘Sunny’ Balwani, the former lover and business partner of Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes, is seen in July after his conviction on the 12 counts

The double conviction of Holmes and Balwani represented a resounding victory for federal prosecutors, who seized the Theranos case as a rare opportunity to hold ambitious entrepreneurs accountable for engaging in technological hyperbole while pursuing fame and glory. the wealth.

In the process, they hoped to discourage the practice of making bold, unproven promises about still-nascent products — a startup strategy known as “fake it until you make it.”

While Holmes insinuated during her trial that Balwani had manipulated her into making bad choices, Balwani’s lawyers explicitly sought to place blame for any wrongdoing entirely on Holmes.

As part of Balwani’s defense, the lawyers pointed out that Holmes was not only CEO, but also a Silicon Valley star who persuaded investors to pour nearly $1 billion into Theranos.

Former Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes, middle, and her mother, Noel Holmes, left, arrive at federal court in San Jose

Former Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes, middle, and her mother, Noel Holmes, left, arrive at federal court in San Jose

At trial, Holmes' lawyers claimed she was the innocent pawn of her manipulative and abusive lover and business partner Ramesh 'Sunny' Balwani

At trial, Holmes’ lawyers claimed she was the innocent pawn of her manipulative and abusive lover and business partner Ramesh ‘Sunny’ Balwani

Holmes was found guilty of duping investors in her $9 billion startup Theranos

Holmes was found guilty of duping investors in her $9 billion startup Theranos

Holmes boasted that her company had found a way to screen for hundreds of potential illnesses with a device called the Edison that could only test a few drops of blood taken with a finger prick.

Such technology could potentially revolutionize healthcare.

But it turned out the Edison never worked properly, providing erroneous test results that Theranos conducted as part of a deal to set up mini-labs in Walgreen’s pharmacies.

Flaws in Theranos’ vaunted technology prompted Holmes and Balwani to move their tests to conventional machines made by other vendors and while taking vials of blood from patients’ veins – a far cry from Holmes’ promises.

Theranos fraudster Elizabeth Holmes returns to court in final bid to overturn her conviction

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