NASA's James Webb Space Telescope has captured the most detailed image of the Orion Nebula which lies 1,344 light-years from Earth, which experts say could provide clues to the first millions years of our own solar system

The James Webb Telescope captures a ‘breathtaking’ image of the Orion Nebula which formed 4.5 billion years ago

The Orion Nebula, which formed more than 4.5 billion years ago, is full of gases of different colors, molecular materials, dust and scattered starlight and a new image taken by the telescope NASA’s James Webb (JWST) spacecraft is the first to look at cosmic formation. center, allowing researchers to better understand how massive stars are spawned by the colossal cloud of dust and gas.

The image shows an open cluster of massive young stars that shape the cloud of dust and gas with its intense radiation and dense filaments that may play a key role in the birth of new stars.

The nebula was previously photographed by the Hubble telescope in 2004, but that device uses visible light and its view has been obscured by large amounts of stardust.

JWST, however, detects infrared light from the cosmos, allowing observers to see through these layers of dust and peer into its cosmic center – a region just seen by human eyes.

The Orion Nebula, which lies 1,350 light-years from Earth, is thought to be similar to our own solar system, which scientists say could provide clues to what happened in the first million years of our planetary evolution.

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope has captured the most detailed image of the Orion Nebula which lies 1,344 light-years from Earth, which experts say could provide clues to the first millions years of our own solar system

A nebula is the name given to a giant cloud in space made of dust, which are also areas that give birth to new stars – the Orion Nebula is thought to have created thousands of new stars.

The new starts emit light which in turn causes the gas cloud to turn stunning reds, blues and greens.

The Orion Nebula measures about 24 light-years in diameter – one light-year is about six trillion kilometers – and is the closest large star-forming region to Earth, allowing it to sometimes be seen with the naked eye.

NASA has previously said the landscape of dust and gas resembles plateaus, mountains and valleys reminiscent of the Grand Canyon.

The image shows an open cluster of massive young stars that shape the colossal cloud of dust and gas with its intense radiation and dense filaments that may play a key role in the birth of new stars

The image shows an open cluster of massive young stars that shape the colossal cloud of dust and gas with its intense radiation and dense filaments that may play a key role in the birth of new stars

The nebula was previously photographed by the Hubble Telescope (left) in 2004, but that device uses visible light and its view has been obscured by large amounts of stardust.  James Webb (right) is able to capture infrared light, allowing him to look past the dust

The nebula was previously photographed by the Hubble Telescope (left) in 2004, but that device uses visible light and its view has been obscured by large amounts of stardust. James Webb (right) is able to capture infrared light, allowing him to look past the dust

“In this bowl of stars, we see Orion’s entire star formation history imprinted in the features of the nebula: arcs, drops, pillars and rings of dust that look like smoke. cigar,” NASA shared in a blog post.

“Each feature tells a story of stellar winds from young stars impacting the stellar environment and ejected material from other stars.”

Western astrophysicist Els Peeters and her team have been working on this project for five years and are proud to finally share the data with the world.

“These new observations allow us to better understand how massive stars transform the cloud of gas and dust in which they were born,” said Peeters, professor of Western astronomy and faculty member at the Institute for Earth and Space. Exploration.

She went on to explain that young massive stars release large amounts of ultraviolet radiation into the surrounding cloud, which changes the shape of the cloud, as well as its chemical composition.

However, how it works, affects stars at a greater distance and how planets form remains a mystery.

JWST captured the “trapezoidal group” of young massifs in the center, which shapes the cloud of dust and gas with its intense ultraviolet radiation.

The Trapezoid Cluster refers to the young, open star cluster in the center of the nebula and has always been hidden due to surrounding dust obscuring the view of scientists.

Here is an image showing a larger area surrounding the Orion Nebula

Here is an image showing a larger area surrounding the Orion Nebula

The new images also show different structures within the nebula, such as the proplyds, which consist of a central protostar surrounded by a disk of dust and gas in which planets reside.

And there are multiple protostellar jets, outflows, and dust-encrusted infant stars scattered across the images.

Emilie Habart, associate professor at the Institute for Space Astrophysics (IAS), said in a statement: “We have never been able to see the intricate details of how interstellar matter is structured in these environments, and to understand how planetary systems can form in the presence of this aggressive radiation.

“These images reveal the legacy of the interstellar medium in planetary systems.”

James Webb Telescope: NASA’s $10 billion telescope designed to detect light from early stars and galaxies

The James Webb Telescope has been described as a “time machine” that could help unlock the secrets of our universe.

The telescope will be used to observe the first galaxies born in the early universe more than 13.5 billion years ago, and observe the sources of stars, exoplanets and even moons and planets in our solar system.

The vast telescope, which has already cost more than $7bn (£5bn), is seen as the successor to the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope

The James Webb Telescope and most of its instruments have an operating temperature of around 40 Kelvin – about minus 387 Fahrenheit (minus 233 Celsius).

It is the largest and most powerful orbiting space telescope in the world, capable of observing 100 to 200 million years after the Big Bang.

The orbiting infrared observatory is designed to be about 100 times more powerful than its predecessor, the Hubble Space Telescope.

NASA likes to think of James Webb as a successor to Hubble rather than a replacement, as the two will be working in tandem for some time.

The Hubble Telescope was launched on April 24, 1990 via Space Shuttle Discovery from Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

It circles the Earth at a speed of approximately 17,000 mph (27,300 km/h) in low Earth orbit at an altitude of approximately 340 miles.

The James Webb Telescope captures a ‘breathtaking’ image of the Orion Nebula which formed 4.5 billion years ago

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